Leonid meteor shower peak: late night November 16 until dawn November 17 Radiating from the constellation Leo the Lion, the Leonid meteor shower is famous. Historically, this shower has produced some of the greatest meteor storms in history – at least one in living memory, 1966 – with rates as high as thousands of meteors per minute during a span of 15 minutes on the morning of November 17, 1966. Indeed, on that beautiful night in 1966, the meteors did, briefly, fall like rain. Some who witnessed the 1966 Leonid meteor storm said they felt as if they needed to grip the ground, so strong was the impression of Earth plowing along through space, fording the meteoroid stream. The meteors, after all, were all streaming from a single point in the sky – the radiant point – in this case in the constellation Leo the Lion. Leonid meteor storms sometimes recur in cycles of 33 to 34 years, but the Leonids around the turn of the century – while wonderful for many observers – did not match the shower of 1966. And, in some years, the Lion whimpers rather than roars, producing a maximum of perhaps 10-15 meteors per hour. Like most meteor showers, the Leonids ordinarily pick up steam after midnight and display the greatest meteor numbers just before dawn. In 2012, however, the waxing crescent moon will setting at early evening, leaving a dark night for Leonid meteor shower. Begin watching anytime around mid-November 2012. The peak morning will be November 17. Have fun!

Dig out your telescopes, guys!

But wait! If you are a Columbia student, there’s a viewing today in the observatory of Pupin from 6-8! The science review board is meeting on the 14th floor at 6, and some major people from the astronomy department will be around to talk about stuff.

Also I heard there might be food?

(Source: earthsky.org)

Notes

  1. aurorean posted this